The role of the pubococcygeus muscle in the sexual health of men and women has been thoroughly documented over the years. The San Francisco Institute for Advanced Study of Human Sexuality published a study on Kegel Exercises in 1983 which focused on the sexual benefits women can get from exercising their PC muscles, while Jack Morin authored a study called Anal Pleasure and Health in 1981. The bottom line of these studies was the simple fact that well toned pelvic muscles, including the PC muscle, improve erection, sexual control and play a key part in achieving orgasm.

The PC muscle can be identified by stopping urination mid-flow. Anybody who has ever tried to keep from urinating knows instinctively what muscles to tense in order to close the urethra and prevent the emptying of your bladder. Men can usually identify the PC muscle by tensing the muscles in their pelvic floor until they find the one that makes their penis jump. This is best done with an erect penis, because the movement of the penis is easier to observe. Basically, the muscle is located between the scrotum and the anus.